Bloodlines



  • Hey everyone :) I thought it might be interesting to have a discussion about equus bloodlines! This is a topic that I have talked about with a few friends, and the results of the conversations are always interesting. So I thought I would ask everyone the following questions. Below each bulletined question I'v listed some thinking points to consider, or not, if you are having trouble thinking about what you might consider in a horses bloodline.

    • When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?

    • What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?
      Is having symmetrical lineage important to you?, Are titles or points important?, Does the age of the horse (in terms of ID number) matter?, Do who the owners of the horses are matter to you? (such as having a foal from everyone's favorite Hano LEC Call Me Casanova and thus a Christina baby!!!)

    • What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?
      Consider the horses titles, points, reputation, amount or quality(do they points/titles of their own ect) of progeny.

    • How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?
      Does a horse have to be fourth, fifth or higher to grab your interest? Is second gen just as acceptable or does it even matter to you?

    • How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?*
      To you, what makes a bloodline rare? Does that make it more sough after and valuable to you, or not?

    • Additional thoughts on bloodlines?


  • PR Committee

    Breeding and bloodlines is actually what drew me into EQ :)

    One of my favourite things on this site to do (Probably my favourite, besides making CC) is planning out a really good breeding with strong bloodlines :drooling_face: I love doing it. Probably to a scary degree :laughing: I think it's mostly because I am a huge fan of 'minmaxing' (RPG term - Maximising your character/horse's strengths and minimising their weaknesses) And this (EQ) provides a really interesting scenario to do that in. For the questions...

    I always look for horses I don't have in my bloodlines already. I've already got horses who are related and it's just annoying to avoid accidental incest :joy: Plus new horses are fresh blood and that's always welcome :thumbsup:

    It's sort of a "goal" of mine to wind up owning horses from certain people (Or having horses be related to them - I got my Casanova great great great grandson, doesn't show up on the MS pedigree but I'm satisfied for now, damn it) but I prefer the term 'side quest' because it's not super important to me, but if I see an opportunity I'll take it :eyes: When it comes down to it, I really do prize points and titles more than I probably should lmao, I still have a TON of foundation horses who do excellently in their disciplines, but there's something more special to me that horses who have successful parents find success themselves and have successful foals. Makes me warm n fuzzy.

    I don't really think anything could really be a turn-off for me in pedigree - Maybe a warmblood grade with too much of a certain breed that might give it a low level cap might make me disinterested, although level cap is really not a big deal with me as long as the horse is doing well. I'd probably have to think more on that one haha!

    Mmm... Generation isn't that big of a concern to me, but a third or fourth gen will 'catch my eye' more than a foundation will in terms of sales and studs/breedings. In the end though I still wind up getting breedings from both lol!

    Bloodlines are rare for me when they're from horses who are immensely successful but do not have many offspring, owned by people with greater self-restrain than me lmao! It just lends a certain quality of specialness to the horse and instantly makes them more valuable.

    (Also, man, I wish career broodmares could be more successful on here. The things I could do.... Mwahahaha.)

  • Moderation Committee

    Ooh so many things to think about!

    What I look for in the pedigree of a sale horse is mostly accomplishment. If someone has put in the time & energy to create horses who are accomplished in their careers, then I am more interested in being part of that chain. Related to this - I am more interested in second gen + horses, just because of the background that comes from not being a foundation. I am not progressively more interested in higher generations purely because they are higher generations.

    Symmetrical lineage is irrelevant to me, as is the age / ID number. As for famous lines... only as a novelty, the same as 'rarity' of line. I'm more likely to pick up a horse from a famous or rare line if it's an unusual breed for me, or just as a hobby. For my main breeds I am much more interested in accomplishments than famous names.

    I find very little negative in a pedigree, apart from strong linebreeding. In my eyes, the scale of pedigrees goes from neutral to good, there are no 'bad' pedigrees or lines.

    I am shamelessly a number / stats / pedigree player, and most of my answers reflect this :)

    Thanks very much for asking these questions, and I look forward to reading other responses!



  • Oo this is interesting!

    When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?

    Depends what I'm after really.. If its a horse to join my competition team then I'm similar to Elsie; I like having foals from horses that have done things and have been active in the community, I just find it more interesting as it's like carrying on a story.

    What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?

    Same as above really, if its titled it usually means that the owner has put some time and effort into it. I'll admit i've honestly never been bitten by the 'Casanova bug', I'm more interested in accomplishments, but I do like to have horses related to ones that I've fallen in love with over time just for sentimental reasons really.

    What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?

    I'm open to breeding to almost any breed and am not too fussed about level caps at all.. so their isn't much that would really make me not want to breed to a horse based entirely on its pedigree other than if it was related to any of my current horses.

    How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?

    For competing horses I like them to preferably be non foundation, but if its a fun not so serious horse then I am honestly not bothered either way. I'm only just on to my third generation, after many years :p

    How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?*

    To me a rare bloodline is one where their are fewer horses, but they are all of a high quality in terms of coat/breeding/etc.



  • What a great discussion! I love talking about these things. :)

    I have a passion for the whole process of sport horse breeding and showing, and Equus is the only way I can scratch that itch at the moment. I absolutely love the feeling of seeing something you planned and made become successful!

    When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree? I look for parents with well-established showing backgrounds; either the parents already have 150+pts or are on track to become highly pointed. I also like seeing horses from old, established lines who have repeatedly proven themselves in the show ring.

    What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?
    Although I'd love to play around with linebreeding (I think that's what you meant by symmetrical lineage?), because it's a very useful tool in real-life sporthorse breeding, I don't think it's looked very well upon in ES; especially because there's just so many successful, talented horses out there to breed to. Titles are definitely very important to me, but what matters the most in my opinion is that the horses in the pedigree come from players who value and cultivate them... not just breeding them 10 times at age 3 and then retiring them!

    What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse? I admit, I have a thing for horses high up on their discipline rankings, although now, with the change in the leaderboard format, it's likely going to be different. I also have a thing for horses with a bunch of bonuses... I don't think I have a non-foundation horse in my show string with fewer than 10 pedigree points. Something that puts me off from a horse's bloodline would be over-breeding and/or under-showing. In my opinion, that just tells me that the owner doesn't value the horse enough. Personally, I only sell horses I've bred to people I really trust, because I like to see my horses flourish in their new homes.

    How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?
    As a rule, I don't buy foundations or imports because I like to make them myself. When I make foundation horses, I always do a lot of research to assign them 'real life' parents -- it's one of my favorite things to do, and I'll tweak their appearance to resemble the parents. Anyway (I went a bit off topic lol), I don't really care about what gen the horses is, as long as it's not straight-outta-CAP, if it gets a bunch of bonus points!

    How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?
    The ratio of the success of the breeding program/horse vs. how many foals they produce.

    Additional thoughts on bloodlines?
    Although I am a stickler for bonus points, I just have to say that I absolutely love foundations! Without them, we would really have nothing.


  • PR Committee

    I decided to answer this as well from the standpoint of someone who competes and raises a breed that doesn't have a history or legacy on Equus. I almost exclusively work with Gypsy Vanners. At one time I think there were some pretty famous Equus horses, and they still kind of are, over with WRNGS. But nothing like the likes of Christina's Casanova

    What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?
    I don't really get to see much pedigree when I'm looking a new vanner, there isn't much to choose from on Equus. Those that have vanners don't readily breed them because it's harder to sell them. a lot of times I feel like I"m kind of hoarding all the vanners on Equus (but really I know there are other people out there with them). In the instance that I did find vanners with nice bloodlines, I will certainly snap it up quick, but I'm just as quick to grab a foundation with good bonuses as well.

    What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to anyone lined horse?
    Honestly, I'm less likely to choose a lot of other vanners and drafts if I can't tamper with the confirmation a little. (not drasticlly) but it also has to do with the fact that a lot of Vanners and Drafts I've picked up are old horses that many users picked up wanting to try something different and later changed their mind (nothing wrong with that!) so I grabbed them and give them a little update (with permission). I'm also less likely to breed to a person's horses if I don't like the confirmation, Because we create the horses ourselves, it also means that breeding to that person's horse, means that I'm likely to get a confirmation I don't like. This is the same reason why I don't mind people tweaking horses I've given them.

    How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?
    Not important at all, at the moment, though it would be really nice to be able to buy second or 3rd gen vanners over foundations. Instead I'm trying to output 3rd and 2nd gens.

    How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?*
    Finding a Vanner with a bloodline is really rare, really rare, and for a lot of other breeds it's really rare too. There are so many Warmbloods on Equus though, that to me, the warmblood with a pedigree is just another horse with a Pedigree. granted it's had a lot of work put into it, but it's so easy with so many horses around of those particular breeds that getting a pedigree is not as difficult anymore. But for some other breeds like the vanners...it's harder to find a pedigree, and for the most part, I have to create new horses so keep from creating horses that are related to each other.



  • When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?
    I look for potential. What the parents have done, what they are going to do in the future, and how available they are (for example if the sire is up for stud would it be better/cheaper to use one of my own mares to breed to him and get perhaps higher bonuses?). I want to see parents who have proven they are if not exceptional, but worthy of passing on their lines. So many horses on ES are being bred IMO, before their time and in doing so undervalues the horse and their offspring. As for adult horse purchases I look for what bonuses they have to offer, potentially how long they have been showing, and what they have earned in that time period. A horse who has been shown 5 times and has 40 points compared to a horse that has been shown ten times with 50 points holds more value to me and has more potential.

    What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?
    I prize multi-titled parents, and especially if they are multi-titled in more than one discipline. If I am looking for a horse for a specific discipline it doesn't much matter, but if they are titled in something else with added bonuses I look at that horse as more versatile, so that I could breed it to not just for example a Park Pleasure mare but a Fine Harness mare as well.

    Is having symmetrical lineage important to you?, Are titles or points important?, Does the age of the horse (in terms of ID number) matter?, Do who the owners of the horses are matter to you? (such as having a foal from everyone's favorite Hano LEC Call Me Casanova and thus a Christina baby!!!)
    Yes and no, I 100% understand the necessities of line breeding, and have used it in my own lines in the past. It is very common in the real world and also very often misused. There is a fine line between line breeding /inbreeding. As far as ES goes, it wouldn't effect me in buying a horse if it was line bred, as long as in buying it, it would be beneficial to my own breeding program. The owners of the horses do not matter to me at all, it is more of the coat, pedigree, discipline, and the owner's rules. As far as horses related to "Famous" horses I guess you would have to define what a "famous" horse actually is. I do not breed Hanos so consequentially have no idea who Casanova is ><, but the same goes for most people who aren't in the gaited community they have no idea who Nightshade is (one of my best gaited horses). I feel like it's more of if I have always admired that horse and got a chance to have a foal from it.

    What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?
    Consider the horses titles, points, reputation, amount or quality(do they points/titles of their own ect) of progeny.

    I think I mentioned most of this above ^^^ parents titles, grandparents, bonus points offered, how other foals are doing in the ring, and how well the horse has done. I will buy a foundation if I really feel like it would benefit my stable, but it has to have everything I am looking for coat+conformation+bonus+titles and with no crazy rules about reclaiming it in two weeks for this that or the other. I also have very little interest in buying a horse who has already had a large number of foals, stallions 1-3, but mares 0-2 are my cut off. I prefer to buy show prospects and retire them for breeding at a later time, rather than buying a horse simply for breeding only.

    How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?
    Does a horse have to be fourth, fifth or higher to grab your interest? Is second gen just as acceptable or does it even matter to you?

    2nd gen is just as acceptable, as long as there are good parents and the foal seems to have potential.

    How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?
    To you, what makes a bloodline rare? Does that make it more sought after and valuable to you, or not?
    *
    I feel like it does. If you can get a foal from horse A at any time, or better yet, breed to one of horse A's many sons and get potentially more bonuses why would you breed to horse A at all? This goes back to what I was saying earlier, that I feel most horses are bred before their time and their value imo can drop because of that.


  • Competition Committee

    I think it honestly depends on what I'm looking to add to my show team. I am more likely to apply/bid on a horse if it comes from a reputable breeder that is well established within the community. It makes me feel special knowing I own a horse from a member that has been on equus for a while and has put the time and effort into making their horses successful in the community.

    symmetrical lineage, titles, and points are all import factors to me when looking for a potential prospect. I also like to pay attention to the names listed. I prefer horses with "older" names and prefixes in their bloodlines versus the newer ones. I think because it makes me feel nostalgic of when I first joined equus and their were only a few top names in the game.

    Factors that I might find positive include: symmetrical and consistent lineage, former generations with successful parents, exclusive lines, and high points with high competing levels. Factors that I think are negative would be: overbreeding, bad conformation, over pricing, too much in breeding, and unrealistic coats.

    Generation is not super important but it is a big plus. It depends on a lot of other factors as well such as conformation, coat quality, and what horses make up the horses pedigree.

    Rarity to means the rate of how successful the horse is versus how many offspring they have produced.

    I think it's amazing how much this community has flourished to the point where we can have these discussions. Equus has really come along way since it started and I can't wait to see what else it has in store as far as breeding and pedigrees.


  • Breed Committee

    ooooh, this looks fun!!!
    I'm going to preface this by saying that I very rarely purchase outside horses or breedings to outside horses when it comes to Arabians, mostly because when I have in the past I've found myself quite disappointed in the actual quality of the horse itself in game, be it coat lacking in detail or the horse's conformation. I have incredibly harsh standards for the Arabs that get to stay in my game, and I absolutely have a "why buy that when I could make a better one myself" mentality. I do have much more lenient standards for the handful of non-Arabs I keep, but as Arabs are my main focus, that’s what I’m going to be talking about here..

    When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?

    When I do find a horse worth buying, I steer clear from foundations and imports unless I can give them a pedigree that either includes my own horses or the creator's, which makes them no longer foundation, rofl. I am a breeder at heart, and obsessed with genetics. A lot of what I enjoy about horses is heredity, lineages, and the interesting histories that go with them. Sim horses without lineage I easily find somewhat dull. Everything I do on Equus is with the intention of breeding, carrying on bloodlines, and achieving glory with my Arabians with each successive generation. With my other breeds I rarely intend to breed them, but want to support those that do breed them by purchasing 2nd gens over foundations.

    What about a horse’s pedigree do you prize most?

    What do I prize most? Above all, realism. I seek out realism in all regards when it comes to horses, so pedigrees are no different. I won't use lines that have unrealistically colored horses in them, I want the horses in the line to have a realistic amount of foals, I want them all to have realistic conformation and color for their breeds/strains.

    What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?

    Quality, to me is hugely determined by points and titles, and therefor they are incredibly important. Just as on realism, and quality of conformation and coats, I will not compromise on having highly achieved lineage as a feature of my horses. I seek creating prestige and greatness with my own horses and presume it’s the same for others. Titles are a must if I am going to consider another player’s horses. And I love being able to brag not just about how achieved my horse’s sire and dam is, but how successful their siblings are too.
    I am always disappointed to find potential breeding stock with a lot of progeny but only a handful of them have ever entered a show. In my mind this is the biggest negative. It shows me that the breeder/owner of the parent horse doesn't value their horses enough to ensure their foals are actually being used.

    Any superbly over-utilized stud is a bit of a no-go for me too and will be excluded in most of my breeding herd's lines, however what I consider overused is likely more lenient than most breeders. ‘Overused’ to me absolutely correlates with the titles held by the parents and their existing progenitors. I may occasionally let one or two individuals out of ‘overused’ studs slip into my breeding program with the intention of limiting the extent of their use as breeding animals. Keeping my herd's pedigrees diverse and unique in relation to what others are breeding is important to me. There's a balance I try to strike between avoiding homogenization (every horse being so diverse in lineage that all of them include the same horses and thus are all related despite their supposed diversity) and every individual horse being strictly kept to one bloodline to the point of severe inbreeding. I plan to lean towards a little line-breeding to avoid either end of the spectrum.

    I guess a lot of this is me being nitpicky, but I absolutely do value symmetrical lineage. I put a lot of time and effort into creating 'balanced' pedigrees in my own lines. It just looks nicer, shows the breeder put more thought, effort, and time into the breedings, plus figuring out pedigree bonuses is easier. I have no issue breeding such horses for other members but will not use horses with unbalanced pedigrees for my own program unless the horse is exceptional in every other way.

    Lastly, I care a lot about what disciplines a horse has. I’m a bit of a ‘discipline purist’ as I rarely have multi-discipline horses and care about my horses having the best possible bonus for their single discipline. I find too often Arabs are already limited in levels they can achieve in most disciplines, and when they aren’t they are expected to go far, as is the case for Endurance. I’d hate to limit them even farther by having them in multiple disciplines, and it’s not too impressive to have an Arab limited to lower levels in Endurance. Since in 3.0 stats are what will be inherited rather than pedigree points based on titles, I’m not going to breed too many horses with multiple disciplines as their progeny will be worse off in one discipline when put against horses with parents in that single one. I’d rather have horses who are really good at one thing than half-way decent in two.

    How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?
    Does a horse have to be fourth, fifth or higher to grab your interest? Is second gen just as acceptable or does it even matter to you?

    Excluding my herd of Arabian foundations from which all my home-breds descend, all of my horses are at least 2nd gen now. As mentioned above, I don’t buy foundations. A lot of it has to do with how hard it was for me to get all my original horses titles and I don't want to do it again when I have enough foundation horses to breed from. Especially when I'd rather expand on existing lines than create totally new ones.
    When buying, 2nd gen is plenty enough so long as the pedigree bonuses are good. I actually tend to find myself put-off from 4th gen+ horses because the pedigrees are rarely symmetrical, have unrealistic parents, or just don’t have what I consider to be quality lines. Because of this, I find 2nd and 3rd gens tend to be more ideal, but I am sure this will change in the future as more lines grow in our community.

    How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?
    To you, what makes a bloodline rare? Does that make it more sought after and valuable to you, or not?

    There is definitely something to be said for exclusiveness when it comes to bloodlines, but for lines that are not my own, I dislike ones that are too obscure to have any demand for them. I want the line to already be successful before I pick them up. And rarity for solely rarity’s sake is a little pointless to me. Far more importantly, I covet bloodlines that have a good ratio of actual horses to titles they hold, if that makes any sense. There has to actually be progeny, for one, and they MUST be titled. I want the sires I use to be proven. Too many untitled descendants is a negative. Ideally, I want each mare in the pedigree to have at least two or three foals who are titled, and each stud I want five or more that hold titles. I don't just care about the quality of parents and grandparents either, but their siblings, aunts, uncles, and cousins, too.
    However, there is also an upper limit. I won't be interested in outside studs that are sired by a stud or siblings to a stud with over 15 to 20 foals depending on how many of them are titled, and the stud himself cannot have more than 25, unless almost every single one of them has three or more titles. Even then I will be more hesitant to breed to them. I’ve never encountered any mares I’ve considered overused, but I’d say 15 offspring is around what I’d considered excessive, and I wouldn’t tolerate a mare having more foals than what’s possible in real life without surrogate mares.

    Additional thoughts on bloodlines?

    I’m gonna take a minute to talk on Linebreeding and Inbreeding here.
    While I support anyone who linebreeds or uses inbred or linebred horses, I am a little cautious about overdoing it myself or using horses that have too much linebreeding or any direct inbreeding because there is a stigma against it, and I don't want to make my lines unmarketable. In my own experience in real life, linebreeding and inbreeding is very important in creating quality horses, and I'd like to see that stigma die down more and see more people embrace it for the sake of realism. Especially since on Equus we won’t ever face health issues from severe long-term inbreeding like what we are seeing in real life with breeds such as Friesians. And even if we did decide to include things of that nature in our role-play, we can easily get around it.

    This relates only to purebred Arabian breeding, but another thing I’d like to see more of is strain mixing. I personally focus on Straight Crabbets, but I have several lines that are made up of multi-strain horses. You see a lot of staunchly SEA breeders and Pure Polish proponents on Equus. While I definitely think these are things that should carry on, I wish more people were open to mixing strains, as the overwhelming majority of purebreds IRL are domestics, or mixed strain horses. Almost every famous Arabian in the past 40 years has had lines from at least two strains, and most have many more. Call me a sucker for realism, but it really opens up a lot more options for breeders and owners, not just in whose horses one can breed to, but for color and conformation options as well.

    However, my biggest take-away is this. I really hope more bloodlines truly flourish on Equus. I can’t wait to see more and more multi-gens becoming the majority over foundations, and how rich Equus’s history will become from it.



    • When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?
      Depending on what I'm looking for, really. But points are important to me. As my game is mostly focused around competitions, points are what matters the most to me. I do have quite a lot of horses with 150+ points, so if I choose to buy a horse from another breeder, I want to make sure that the horse is worth buying for me. That means the parents (as I tend to buy younger horses to have them with me for a long time) need to come from show stables who activily shown the horse in competitions and made sure the offspring gets the best possible start for their own career in the discipline. As said, I do have a lot of horses with 150+ points to breed and get quality offspring from, horses I buy need to have parents with equally points. Any offspring coming from parents below 100+ really throws me off because I don't see the need to breed or buy a horse when I can get a more qualified horse myself by breeding them from my horses. And, I must admit I love members who keep their horses active to a resonable age before retiring them. I know that a lot of members consider a horse to be old when they just hit the 10 years mark and I have to admit I am a bit thrown off from buying or breeding a horse when I see that the horse is still young but just because it hit a certain amount of points it gets retired to breeding. I personally compete my horses until they are somewhat around the age of 15-17 before retiring them because a lot of my horses doing terribly in their younger age and as soon as they hit the 8-10 years mark, they do extremely well in their discipline. So I keep on competing and showing them, so they often have around 300-600 points (depending if they just have 1 or 2 discipline they compete in) and I'd wish members would consider to keep on competing them to a reasonable age regardless of points. But this is just my way of playing Equus Sims; but realism is a big big thing when I consider to breed to another member's horse or buy one.

    • What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?
      Points and an active background. I care less about famous horses in my horse's pedigree (even though some of them have quite famous parents/grandparents) and I also care less about the number of foals they produced or if former offspring did well. That has something to do with that I know that you can't assure that each member you sold a horse to or bred a foal for keeps the horse active. So a lot of horses have offspring with no title at all but it's simply for the fact that the member didn't show the horse (for whatever reason) but this has nothing to do with the quality of the offspring. If I buy a horse from another member I make sure that the horse stays active. I struggled a lot with having all my horse entered to T-Shows when they were still around but I at least showed them in R-Shows and I love seeing my horses coming from zero to be champions in their sport. Of course, not all my horses have luck in R-Shows so I cannot gurantee for each horse to hit 200 points but I try hard to have them at least hitting the 150+ mark or close to it. So I don't force a member to achieve the international with every horse they own but I do price effort a lot. So if someone decides to offer a horse for stud or breed their horses, I need to see the effort they put into the horse. A member who decides to put a horse for stud at the age of 7 or whatever and the horse has just gained 50 points, I won't consider buying or breeding. Just for having a gen horse? Nah ... I prefer to compete my foundations then to have them gain their points and then later on breed from them.
      When it comes to line-breeding, I don't have a problem with it as long as it isn't a pure inbred line. But if my horses have, for example the same granddad in their pedigree but they are worth breeding together, I do it. IRL linebreeding is a big thing in horse breeding, so I'm not thrown off by it as long as they are not full or half siblings. But they can have one same grandparent, that's fine with me. Especially if you want to refine characteristics in conformation or in their temperaments. So play-wise you could add some understandable realism here when wanting to have horse very similar in stats and conformation to their sire/dam for example.
      And apart from points and an active showing background, quality in the coat and conformation is something I can get picky about. Nevermind the amount of points or whatever generation, if the horses don't appeal to me, I won't buy it. And because of that, there are just some members I consider buying from, I'm afraid. So my horses are more or less related to each other in one way or another.

    • What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?
      Of course a long list of active and sucessfull parents/grandparents. But I have to admit I am a bit of split personality here. You see, if I have a 3rd or 4th or 5th generation horse, I really love seeing some varity in the pedigree points-wise. To me, that adds realism to my game. Especially in warmblood breeding (don't know about other breeds though) the stud is really important, much more than the dam. So if the dam has a really good conformation and somewhat around 75-100 points and the stallion has 200 points, I would consider the offspring worth buying. To me, the dam doesn't have to have a hugh amount of points before breeding (don't get me wrong, anything below 75 I won't consider in my bloodlines) while the stallion definitly has to have at least 150 points before breeding. So not every parent or grandparent or grand-grandparent need to have 200 points, I prefer varity here in the dam's line. Not so much in the stallion's pedigree though stud-wise. I hope that makes any sense.
      When it comes to breeds, I am not too strict about it. I breed and compete warmbloods so there is no strict rule about them to only breed to certain breeds. And honestly I am really glad that the strict rule only Hanoverian to another Hanoverian or only a Holsteiner to another one got thrown to the side. When I started out on Equus Sims, a lot of members had this (exscuse me here) stupid rule about only the warmblood breed of the stud can be bred to it. It always bugged me because that is not the way warmblood breeding operates irl and I am more than glad that this has thankfully changed and we have a lot more varity in the pedigree of our horses.

    • How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?
      2nd generation horses are fine. To me, as someone who competes her horses to a really old age, I don't have any horse higher than being 2nd or 3rd generation after many years of being active here at Equus Sims. And because of that I'm fine if other members are not any further because they love their pretty pixels and show them nevermind if they are only foundations or 2nd generations. To be honest, if a member puts up a foundation or 2nd generation horse after they had an incredible active life I will consider breeding to it much more likely than to a 4th generation horse with only a few pedigree points to offer because someone just put minimal effort in the horse before consider breeding it.

    • How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?*
      That's a good question. To me a rare bloodline is of high quality points-wise but only with a very limited amount of foals tracing back to it. This is a little bit what I do with my horses. Since I don't offer any breedings with my horses to the public anymore because of really bad experiences, I only breed one or two foals out of my stallions/mares for my own use. It's quite sad, to be honest thinking about that I started competing my horses with the thought of having them of some worth to the public only finding me making them exclusive to my own use.



  • When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?

    I generally look for horses that are a bit more accomplished and have been pretty active. I'll be focusing more on breeding and selling than buying now that I have plenty of horses, probably too many by some estimates. I do look at conformation and the coat as best I can, but since my exposure to horses has been limited to a computer or television screen I don't have a perfect eye for conformation.

    What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?

    Generally, I'll look at the parents and the bonuses/points. I like having horses from fairly well-known parents if I can, but if an unknown bloodline offers better bonuses then that's the one I've gone for in the past. I also tend to aim for pedigrees that aren't present in any of my horses since I want to avoid accidentally breeding horses that are related.

    What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?

    There's not much that will deter me from a particular pedigree since I'm even looking at potentially allowing Grade Horses to be bred from my own.

    How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?

    The generation isn't really important to me. I'll just as soon grab a second generation or a foundation horse as I will a fourth or fifth.

    How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?

    Probably by how many foals the parents and their parents have produced. You have some good horses out there who have maybe only one or two foals while some have over a dozen.



    • When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresh faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?
    • While i like a horse that's got titled parents most of the time I am careful that the horse I am buying doesn't cause to close of a relation to my own horses. I will NEVER by a line bred horse and I do try not to breed to them. It noting agonist the people that do but i personally don't like it and kinda seems weird to me. I know it is done in real but I again just don't like it.
    • What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?
    • Proven show lines is a big thing for me. I have a few special horses that I like to have there lines while was mainly RDO Colonel's Gold Bar and LR Buccaneer but yea proven showing lines are main thing.
    • What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?
    • Linebred horse are something i tend to stay away from [just a personal thing]. Not so much i negative thing but i tend to stay away from a line I have a lot of as I don't want to cross lines.
    • How important is the generation of the horse you are buying, to you?
      Does a horse have to be fourth, fifth or higher to grab your interest? Is second gen just as acceptable or does it even matter to you?
    • Not all that important. I won't buy an untitled foundation unless is have are to die for coat but if the horses has points I will look at buying.
    • How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?*
      To you, what makes a bloodline rare? Does that make it more sough after and valuable to you, or not?
    • If the horses has 5 or under foals and depending where there are. As if a owner has 8 foals from that dam or sire but has all the offspring then it is rarer to me as the community doesn't have the access to the lines. But in all honestly are rare lined horse is worth the same as a popular lined horse unless the horse is rare and pointed and the popular horses as farmed purely for lines.
    • Additional thoughts on bloodlines?
    • While they are popular when buying at the end of the day correct conformation and coat quality is a higher appear for me. Because you could have the best lined horse on Equus and if the conformation is wrong or not to my taste I wont touch it. Also if the horse has to give a great presentation as well. I look for horse with solid correct conformation and healthy looking coat. The right amount of shine and not to flat or not to shiny like a disco ball. But i don't like flat horse with no shine that make them look unhealthy and like they have permanent winter coat. I look for performance and show horses that give a spark to an arena.


  • When looking at a horse that is for sale, regardless if it is an adult with points or a weanling still fresg faced in the world, what do you look for in its pedigree?

    In my first months here on equus I don't cared about pedigrees at all. I just cared about coat and confo. (Pedigree Bonuses didn't play any role that time) Now that has changed a bit. As many others here said before me, I am looking mostly for titled horses who are realistically competed. That means to me, that they don't get retired a certain age cause the have now their max title.
    I joined ES to bring more realism in my Stud and to show my horses off! If someone just let the horse earn any title and retires it in the age of 7 and breeds then 20 foals out of it...it doesn't fullfills the sense of ES in my opinion. I also don't care about "Stars" in my pedigree. Of course it sounds great if you have well-known names like Cas in your horses pedigree but I rather look on it's confo and coat to know if I want that horse or not.

    What about a horses pedigree do you prize most?
    As already said I go for realism in it's parentage and grand-parentage! I like to see when the horse has titled parents who are not retired at age of 7 (or in that range xd )
    Earlier as I joined ES, I really wanted to have no outcrosses to my breed. So Trakes have to be bred to Trakes and so on...but now I see that otherwise. You can refine your foals confo if you add another breed to it's lineage and I think that's very interesting to me! So it's okay for me to breed different breeds together :D
    Because it was also spoken from earlier in this Thread, I have to say, that I want my horses (that I breed together) not to be related to eacht other in any way. With that I can assure that I bring fresh blood into my lines! I am not offended when someone does that (like @Aliisa-Pohl said, it's quite normal to do that, to inherite certain characteristics), but I won't do that myself.

    And as said in the first answer, stars in my lineage are no need ^^

    What factors do you find positive in a pedigree, and the horses in them? What factors do you find negative and might cause you to not buy or breed to any one lined horse?
    Consider the horses titles, points, reputation, amount or quality(do they points/titles of their own ect) of progeny.

    Positive factors are definetly coat and confo. If a horse has a nice confo and a nice coat, I would consider to breed with it or buy it and won't care if it's a foundi or a 2nd, 3rd, 4th... gen horse. I mean, there is always that one horse you fall in love an definetly want a foal of it!
    To be honest I never look on the progeny of a horse I want a foal from. Luck plays a big role on ES and I think the breeder, when he keeps the horse active, can't anything for the Bad Luck of the Horse! So I don't consider it for a breeding. The only thing I look on is the realism of the progeny so...how many foals the horse already has produced. I know stallions can have a real big bunch of foals ^^ but it's quite unrealistic when a Mare has got 20 foals at age 12. So, that's what I take a look on then :D

    How importabt is the generation of the horse you are buying to you?
    Does a horse have to be fourth, fifth or higher to grab your interest? Is second gen just as acceptable or does it even matter to you?

    As you already read, I really don't look on the generation of the horse I am buying. It's nice to have a high gen horse. But if there is a foundi who has a breathtaking confo + nice coat, I still consider to buy it! The Breeder (or Creator) still put a lot of effort into his characteristics and just think about it: Without foundis the whole ES Breeding wouldn't even exist because it had to start somewhere ^^

    How do you judge the rarity of a bloodline?
    To you, what makes a bloodline rare? Does that make it more sough after and valuable to you, or not?

    For me, a rare bloodline is, when a horse is not often bred. (simple as it is ^^) Rare coat colours are on ES quite popular, so I wouldn't consider that as a rare point.

    And yes, that is a point that would be very valuable for me! If you have one out of two foals of a beautiful and high-pointed Stally whose not going to have more foals you may feel that your little foal has a lot of value!

    Additional thoughts on bloodlines?

    I have to say it in my conlusion again: For me coat and confo ar the A and O of a Horse. I won't consider a horse for breeding that has a bad confo. As in Reallife, the conformation is the foundation of a horse's career. So I also pay a lot of attention to it here on ES, because I think ES is made to bring more realism to all the horse simmers.

    Awesome idea @Thomas-Thorley :D it's really interesting to read what other think about Breeding and Buying of Other's Horses :smile:


Log in to reply

Looks like your connection to EQUUS | Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.